American Friction Welding has performed a large variety of friction welds, this gallery details just a small percentage of that achievement. (Photos not to scale, see dimension guidelines)

Using Tubes

Thinwall Tube to Solid Friction Welded

Join thinwall tube to solid base.

Silencer tube to machined end cap friction welded

Silencer Tube to Machined End Cap Friction Welded

Join thinwall tube to machined base.


hollow-tube-center-friction-welded

Join solid caps to both ends of tube for hollow center.

 

Solid to Tube Friction Welded

Join heavy wall tube to solid end to avoid extensive drilling. Image shows progression from 1) raw material, to 2) blank weldment, to 3) finish machined to print.


Tube Joint Friction Welded

Friction Welded tube wall section through joint. Strength and performance are equal to solid material.


Nickel Alloy to DOM Tube Friction Welded

Join dissimilar metals as in this case with nickel ends to DOM tube.


Friction welded drill rod cutaway

Cross cut section of well drilling rod. Threaded end is friction welded to drill pipe body.

Near-Net Blanks

Friction welded impeller blank

Use a near-net-blank to save machining time and material.


Food grade impeller friction welded

This pump impeller is machined from the blank above.


Drive gear blank

Drive gears are made from Friction Welded blanks to save on forging cost and to shorten lead times.


Valve blank before and after

In this example, valve pistons are machined from a near-net blank.


Tee fitting friction welded

This near-net blank “tee-fitting” is ready for finish machining.


Bi metal thermal couple friction welded

Three piece blank made of dissimilar metals ready for finish machining.


Sucker rod friction welded

Blank bi-metal oilfield sucker rod ready to be machined.


Specialty fasteners friction welded

Create high strength specialty fasteners


AFW Cost Comparison Infographic

Click to see savings potential

Unusual Shapes

Ball joint showing part orientation

Join with orientation to opposite end features as seen in the port alignment on this ball joint.


Shaft to casting friction welded

Cold formed shafts are Friction Welded to Powder Metal ends. These cutting tools are shown before and after weld-flash removal.


Forging to casting

Forged valves are Friction Welded to cast guide legs.


Friction welded propshaft to CV joint

Propshaft Friction Welded to CV Joint.


Offset shafts to plate

Offset opposing shafts joined to common plate.


Tube to Threaded Solid

Threaded cold formed solid ends joined to honed tubes.


Piston Rod Double Ended

Double ended hydraulic piston rod is bonded with the advantage of a full strength, penetration fusion of material.


actuator

This special casting is bonded to a carbon steel shaft.


Hydraulic cylinder trunnion block

Pivot shafts are bonded with friction welding to sides of this hydraulic cylinder base. This creates a trunnion block to allow swiveling hydraulic cylinders.

Unique Materials

Copper to aluminum friction welded

Bi-Metal Friction Welding of copper to aluminum busbar (bus bar) for electrical components industry. Bend test verifies weld strength.


Brass tube to solid friction welded

Brass tube Friction Welded to solid base.


Stainless to carbon steel bend test

Friction Weld stainless to carbon steel with outstanding joint strength.


Bi metal electric diode friction welded

Copper to silver Friction Welded to make an electric diode.


Friction welded aluminum bend test

Aluminum bar stock destructive bend test showing strength of friction welded bond.


Marine bi metal prop shaft

Marine Prop Shafts are an excellent bi-metal application. The “wet-end” is made from 17-4 stainless steel. The drive-end is sealed in the power transmission unit and is made from hardended 8620 carbon steel.

Case Studies

Learn about the economics and performance results of extending cobalt tool tips with mild steel extension shafts.

Durability requirements in the chemical manufacture and handling industry dictate the use of expensive alloys to withstand harsh environments. Learn how performance and economics are improved by friction welding an alloy “wet end” to a carbon steel main shaft.

This case study illustrates how friction welding, or bonding as it is sometimes called, is used to join uniquely shaped ends to hardened chrome rod with all the strength of solid material.